Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Mustang HS SAT

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Mustang

Amongst the myriad of cars and trucks produced by the Ford Motor Company, perhaps the most famous model of them all is the Ford Mustang, an affordable sports car option for parsimonious individuals.

The famous Mustang is also known as a “Pony Car”, a sort of “muscle car”. You do not have to be affluent to own one, since it’s not exactly a majestic car, but at the same time you cannot be penniless. The Ford Mustang is offered at a great value, but an impecunious homeless person would probably still not be able to afford one.

– 2 –


– 3 –

On many occasions, the Mustang has been named by respected car magazines as one of the top ten best cars available on the market. It has even won a number of car-of-the-year awards. First released in 1964, the Mustang sold nearly 1.5 million units in its first eighteen months and has since been consistently enhanced to remain successful. Furthermore, there are copious numbers of Mustangs available, unlike many other sports cars whose production numbers are limited.

Although Ford makes sure that its Mustang is available enough to not become depleted, it is careful not to produce a surfeit, or popularity might decrease due to overexposure. Fortunately, even though they are always able to garner enough popularity for the Mustang, Ford has never exhibited any signs of avarice.

– 4 –

One reason the Mustang has been consistently popular throughout the course of its life is that Ford has significantly augmented the model of the Mustang many times throughout the life of the model, making more than paltry advancements each time.

– 5 –

The first model was a two-seat, mid-engine car. It was produced from 1964 to1973. Many minor changes were made during that period, but the major design change that marked the second generation of the Mustang did not arrive until 1974.

In 1973, Ford believed that the Mustang had digressed too far from its fundamental design, so an entirely new design replete with changes was prepared for 1974. The result was the second generation Mustang. The Mustang II was based on another car, the Ford Pinto. The new Mustang sold more than 400,000 units the first year. It featured advanced innovations such as rack-and-pinion steering and a mechanism that drastically decreased noise and vibration.

– 6 –

In 1979, the third generation Mustang became available. This new model differed from the smaller, compact, scanty model of Mustangs that were previously popular. The interior was completely recreated and could seat four people. It also featured a larger trunk. Overall, the platform was roomier than before. This new, third generation platform was known as the “Fox”.

– 7 –

The fourth generation Mustang began in 1994 and marked the first time in 15 years that the platform of the Mustang was redesigned. In 1994, for the third time in the mustang’s history, the mustang was named car of the year by the renowned Motor Trend magazine. In 2003, once again, Ford changed the Fox-based platform of the Mustang Cobra. This cobra not only featured the 4.6L V8 32 valve engine as the previous cobra but it had a radical addition of an Eaton Supercharger, supported by its new 390 horsepower inter-cooled cast iron engine block.

The new platform also featured a change from the 5-speed Tremec transmission to the T-56 6-speed. Ford internally gave this new SVT Mustang Cobra platform the codename, “The Terminator”.

– 8 –

It was so named because it was meant to terminate the competition, and finally lay to rest disputes on whether the Mustang or Chevrolet Camaro, the Mustang’s historic rival, was better. Ironically, the Camaro was also discontinued the same year due to low sales. The fourth generation Mustang ran through 2004.

– 9 –

The fifth, and present day generation of the mustang came in 2005. The new look of the mustang was modeled after the first generation mustangs. This new platform inspired by the Mustangs of the 1960’s, featured a “retro-futurism” design by combining the classic essence and look of the original mustangs with modern technology and a hint of modern looks.

Included in these modern technological upgrades is the new 4.6L 3-valve Modular V8 engine with variable camshaft timing. In line with inspiration of these new Mustangs, new high performance models have been created in tribute to the great classic models such as the Boss 302 Mustang, the Mach 1, the Mustang SVO, the SVT Cobra, and of course the Shelby GT500.

– 10 –

With the different generations of models, Ford has also produced variants of each type of Mustang featuring different engines and commodities (such as the V6, GT, Cobra, and others). However, the high performance models are fabricated in paucity. Many people make personal changes to their own cars, creating sort of a “unique generation.” The high customizability of the Mustang has been a great contributing factor to the popularity of the Mustang throughout the generations.

– 11 –

Mustang enthusiasts love to modify their cars. Some of these changes can be opulent, to the point where they are ostentatious. Oftentimes, many of these changes are made to increase the car’s horsepower and speed. However, this can be dangerous, and prodigal individuals should be careful not to squander their sumptuous cars by wrecking them.

The Mustang model remains profuse to this day. The death of the Mustang is nowhere to be foreseen. Considering it’s a sports car, the price tag has also remained affordable even for frugal individuals. Although the Mustang probably still remains expensive for those that are destitute, Ford’s aim to maintain the mustang as an economical vehicle has been anything but miserly.

– 12 –

The arrival of the next Mustang generation is unknown, but given the history of the Mustang and Ford’s ability to produce popular cars, it is highly unlikely that there will be a dearth of buyers for the next Mustang.

– 13 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Augment

2. ____ Avaricious

3. ____ Deplete

4. ____ Enhance

5. ____ Frugal

6. ____ Garner

7. ____ Miserly

8. ____ Parsimonious

9. ____ Prodigal

A. Improve, make, better

B. Cheap, penny-pinching

C. Gather, collect

D. Supplement, add to, expand

E. To waste, spend, misuse

F. Demise, end, fall

G. Shortage, lack, drought

H. Poor, penniless

I. Impoverished, needy, indigent

– 14 –

10. ____ Squander

11. ____ Death

12. ____ Dearth

13. ____ Destitute

14. ____ Homeless

15. ____ Impecunious

J. Destitute, living on the streets

K. Greedy, covetous

L. Eat up, diminish

M. Miserable, stingy, measly

N. Wasteful, profligate, dissolute

O. Thrifty, economical, stingy

– 15 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a word in right column that best matches its definition.

16. ____ Paltry

17. ____ Paucity

18. ____ Penniless

19. ____ Penury

20. ____ Scanty

21. ____ Affluent

22. ____ Copious

23. ____ Majestic

A. Rich, prosperous, well off

B. Poverty, pennilessness

C. Countless, multitude

D. Pretentious, brazen, showy

E. Surplus, excess

F. Scarcity, lack, rarity

G. Plentiful, abundant, prolific

H. Luxurious, plush, superb

– 16 –

24. ____ Myriad

25. ____ Opulent

26. ____ Ostentatious

27. ____ Profuse

28. ____ Replete

29. ____ Sumptuous

30. ____ Surfeit

I. Complete, sated, full

J. Impoverished, broke, bankrupt

k. Abundant, plentiful, numerous

L. Wealthy, lavish, magnificent

M. Scarce, very little, insufficient

N. Worthless, wretched, base

O. Royal, regal, grand

– 17 –

Multiple Choice

1. The mustang was created by _____.

A. Chevrolet

B. The Ford Motor Company

C. Fordever Motors

D. Dodge

2. The Mustang is also known as a “_____”

A. Sedan

B. Pony Car

C. Horse wagon

D. Horse Buggy

– 18 –

3. The Mustang was first released in _____

A. 1890

B. 1910

C. 1964

D. 1987

4. The third generation (1979-1993) Mustang is known as the

A. “Eleanor”

B. “Bullitt”

C. “Knight Rider”

D. “Fox”

– 19 –

5. The 2003 SVT Mustang Cobra was codenamed the

A. “General Lee”

B. “Kit”

C. “Terminator”

D. “Superman”

– 20 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ The Mustang sold nearly 1.5 million units in its first eighteen months it was released.
2. ____ The first Mustang was a two-seat mid-engine car.
3. ____ The Cobra made by Ford is not a mustang.
4. ____ A “Retro-futurism” design means it is completely futuristic and contains nothing from the past.
5. ____ The Mustang II was based on the Ford Pinto.
6. ____ The 2005 Mustang was designed to look similar to the mustangs from the 1960’s.
7. ____ The Mustang only comes in one standard engine for all of its models.

– 21 –

Short Answer

1. Name and briefly discuss some of the high performance mustangs.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Why have Mustangs been so popular over the years?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 22 –

3. What does the “unique generation” of mustangs refer to? Explain.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What is your favorite Mustang? Why?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 23 –

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 24 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 25 –







Mustang HS SAT
Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Medicine HS SAT

Page 2 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Questions Page 12 Questions Page 14 Questions Page 16 Questions Page 18 Questions Page 20 Questions




This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Medicine

Medicine refers to the practice concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through study, diagnosis, and treatment. Physicians, also known as doctors, are the individuals that are qualified and receive approbation to study and practice medicine. Since the 19th century, only those with a medical degree have been considered worthy to practice medicine. Physicians are some of the most venerated members of society.

– 2 –


– 3 –

The medical profession is composed of the group of people formally trained and authorized to apply medical knowledge. Many countries and legal jurisdictions have regulations on who is permitted to practice medicine. Within the medicine field, there are various specialties, such as family practice, cardiology, neurology, sports medicine, research, or public health.

Human societies have had various systems of health care practice since the beginning of recorded history. The earliest type of medicine in most cultures was the use of plants, herbs, and animal parts. This medicine was usually used in conjunction with specious rituals of various kinds. Some of these apocryphal beliefs include animism (the belief that inanimate objects have spirits), spiritualism (appealing to gods or communion with ancestor spirits), and shamanism (vesting an individual with mystic powers).

– 4 –


– 5 –

Medicine, as it is practiced today, developed largely in the late eighteenth century, and early nineteenth century in England, Germany, and France. Even today, there are still many different viewpoints concerning the proper application of medicine.

Sometimes, when it is disputable which opinion is right or better than another, experts may belittle and deride each other which can leave many people feeling acrimonious. However, most doctors today are viewed with deference because of their prestigious position in society. Many people would trade places to be in a doctor’s shoes.

Many physicians are so easygoing and casual that their attitude belies the dedication and effort put forth to take care of patients. Some doctors are so good that they receive adulation and acclaim in the form of accolades for their work

– 6 –

Some doctors are experts in their field and are extolled for it. However if an unfortunate calumny were to spread, all of this can be taken away in a second. The field of medicine is constantly changing and new theories and ideas are constantly being tested. Many new findings are deprecated or denounced if they seem too absurd and do not have adequate support.

– 7 –

So, although rare, some reports may even be embellished or fabricated in order to gain approval from the medical field. These spurious documents are usually quickly exposed. Gossip in the field of medicine can spread like wildfire if a promising new advancement is discovered.

A vital aspect of medicine is the relationship between the patient and doctor. Although many people visit the doctor’s office for similar problems such as a cold, flu, shots and others, their experiences can be vastly different, depending on the attitude of the doctor. Sometimes the doctor’s attitude can make the difference in the visit being fun or painful.

Doctors should always be tolerant and helpful towards their patients, never using caustic remarks to disparage the ones they should be helping.

– 8 –

The patients don’t necessarily have to exalt their doctor and sometimes if a doctor makes a serious mistake, the patient may go off on a diatribe and impugn the doctor.

The physicians that are caring and understanding are usually the ones that are commended and eulogized. Unfortunately, sometimes doctors have to break bad news to patients. It is a difficult task, but the worst thing a doctor could do is equivocate. Any kind of attempt to prevaricate will inevitably have drastic consequences. Honesty is vital to the doctor-patient relationship.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Acrimonious

2. ____ Belittle

3. ____ Caustic

4. ____ Denounce

5. ____ Deprecate

6. ____ Deride

7. ____ Diatribe

A. Denounce, criticize, condemn

B. An attack, harangue, rant

C. Hold responsible, charge

D. Tribute, honor, award

E. Scathing, sarcastic, corrosive

F. Deal, skill, exchange

G. Praise, entrust, hand over

– 10 –

8. ____ Disparage

9. ____ Impugn

10. ____ Trade

11. ____ Acclaim

12. ____ Accolade

13. ____ Adulation

14. ____ Approbation

15. ____ Commend

I. Adoration, admiration, reverence

J. Ridicule, mock, disdain

K. Demean, put down

L. Approval, consent

M. Condemn, accuse

N. Belittle, denigrate

O. Approval, praise

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ____ Deference

17. ____ Eulogize

18. ____ Exalt

19. ____ Extol

20. ____ Venerate

21. ____ Apocryphal

22. ____ Belie

23. ____ Calumny

A. False, sham, erroneous

B. Contradict, disprove

C. Mythical, legendary

D. Hedge, stall, evade

E. Prevaricate, beat around the bush

F. Make up, manufacture

G. Admire, worship

H. Rumor, scandal, hearsay

– 12 –

24. ____ Embellish

25. ____ Equivocate

26. ____ Fabricate

27. ____ Gossip

28. ____ Prevaricate

29. ____ Specious

30. ____ Spurious

I. Respect, reverence

J. Extol, sing the praises of

K. Bogus, counterfeit, illegitimate

L. Decorate, adorn, exaggerate

M. Slander, defamation

N. Praise, applaud

O. Revere, idolize

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Medicine refers to the practice concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through:

A. Study, prediction, hypothesis
B. Study and experiments
C. Study, diagnosis, and treatment
D. Observation, hypothesis, and approbation

2. Another word for “Doctor” is:

A. Physicist
B. Physician
C. Pharmacist
D. Scientist

– 14 –

3. The following are sub-branches of the medicine field except:

A. Cardiology
B. Itchyology
C. Neurology
D. Sports medicine

4. Doctors receive ________ to study and practice medicine.

A. Specious
B. Apocryphal
C. Animism
D. Approbation

5. The earliest type of medicine in most cultures was the use of

A. Dirt and water
B. Rubbing alcohol
C. Plants, herbs and animal parts
D. None of the above

– 15 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ Within the medicine field, there are various specialties

2. ____ Human societies have had various different systems of health care practice since at least the beginnixng of recorded history.

3. ____ Shamanism is a neurological disorder.

4. ____ Honesty is vital to the doctor-patient relationship, even when bad news is being delivered.

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

5. ____ The field of medicine remains constant and has few changes in practice or new theories.

6. ____ Equivocation is an essential skill in a doctor-patient relationship.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. Discuss some of the early types of medicine and beliefs that were practiced

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Explain the Doctor-patient relationship and why it is vital.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

3. Who can practice medicine and what is necessary to do so?.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. Why is the practice of medicine so essential to our society?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 21 –







Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

The American Red Cross HS SAT

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

The American Red Cross

The American Red Cross, headquartered in Washington D.C., is an aid organization that provides emergency assistance, disaster relief, and education within the United States. It is part of a larger organization called the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, which has branches worldwide.

There is nothing boring or banal about disasters; and although many insensitive people may show apathy towards helping others suffering damages from natural disasters, the Red Cross is everywhere and makes sure to help those in need.

The American Red Cross is not a taciturn organization. They are impartial and respond to wherever there is need. There is a common metaphoric and pithy phrase that the Red Cross is a giant first aid kit.

– 2 –

In addition to domestic disaster relief, the American Red Cross also offers services in five other areas: community services for the poor; aid and support for the military and their families; the collection, processing, and distribution of lifesaving blood; educational programs promoting health and safety; and international relief and development programs.

– 3 –

The American Red Cross is governed by volunteers and supported by community donations. It is divided nationwide into 800 chapters, each dedicated to saving lives and helping people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. Annually, more than one million Red Cross volunteers assemble relief efforts for families affected by disasters, train almost twelve million people in lifesaving skills, and exchange more than a million emergency messages for U.S. military service.

Annually, more than one million Red Cross volunteers assemble relief efforts for families affected by disasters, train almost twelve million people in lifesaving skills, and exchange more than a million emergency messages for U.S. military service.

The Red Cross is also the largest supplier of blood and blood products to more than 3,000 hospitals across the nation. Those statistics are not sarcasm or a hyperbole.

– 4 –

The Red Cross also assists victims of international disasters and conflicts throughout numerous locations worldwide. The American Red Cross supplies about 44% of the donated blood in the United States.

In December of 2004, the American Red Cross finished building their largest blood processing facility in the United States, located in Pomona, California on the campus grounds of the California State Polytechnic University. Each year, the American Red Cross makes immediate responses to more than 70,000 disasters, including house or apartment fires (the leading cause of disaster responses), hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, hazardous material spills, transportation accidents, explosions, and other natural or man-made disasters.

– 5 –

Oftentimes when disaster strikes, chaos can break out and acquisitive individuals begin looting (a jargon or an euphemism for robbing, stealing, and plundering).

Although the American Red Cross is not a government agency, its authority to provide disaster relief was formalized in 1905, when the Red Cross was chartered by Congress. The succinct charter, which is not laconic or concise by any means, is not only a grant of power, but also an order of duties and obligations to the nation, to disaster victims, and to the people who support its work with their donations. The American Red Cross disaster relief focuses on meeting people’s immediate emergency disaster-caused needs.

When a disaster strikes or threatens to do so, the Red Cross provides shelter, food, and health and mental health services which are congruent with the basic of human needs. The broad spectrum of services provided by the American Red Cross resulted in the charter being anything but terse.

– 6 –

In addition to these services, the core of Red Cross disaster relief is the assistance given to individuals and families affected by disasters in order to enable them to resume their normal daily activities independently.

You can help the Red Cross by doing your part even by doing simple things such as donating food that you find bland or don’t eat, or by donating the clothes that you might find to be prosaic, plain, and/or hackneyed and don’t wear. Everyone has trite clothing that can be given away to help out those in need. You can also help by donating blood.

– 7 –

There is such a great and constant need for blood that it is somewhat of an enigma, leading many puzzled people to wonder why more people don’t donate blood. It’s almost ironic that there is blood available in every person yet it is not easily obtained from able people.

If you feel that your daily routine is too tedious, ordinary, or insipid, you can change your life by becoming a volunteer. By doing such simple things, one can make such a tremendous difference in the lives of others.

– 8 –








Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Paris HS SAT

Page 2 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Questions Page 12 Questions Page 14 Questions Page 16 Questions Page 18 Questions Page 20 Questions




This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Paris

Paris is the capital city of France, and is located in the northern region. It has an estimated population of a little over two million people. The population of France is twelve million, making it one of the most populated areas in Europe.

Today, Paris is one of the world’s leading business and cultural centers, and its influence on politics, education, entertainment, media, fashion, and art all contribute to its status as a major global city. All of these various influences are diffused throughout the city. When visiting Paris, digressing from your original plan is common since there are so many things to do there. Even if you are a recluse, you will likely run into something appealing to your taste.

– 2 –


– 3 –

The very name “Paris” often incites thoughts of romance and love. Much like the French language is said to be the language of love, Paris is considered a romantic city of love. The city is also an important hub of intercontinental transportation and is home to universities, sporting events, opera houses, and famous museums. Paris is home to some of opera’s virtuoso performers.

All of these traits and many more, make Paris an attraction for over 30 million foreign visitors per year. Instead of xenophobes, Paris is filled with tourist attractions and accommodations for people. The atmosphere in Paris is known for being joyful and it could probably convert a misanthrope. Paris is a place where philistines can become cultured and educated. In Paris, no one is a pariah.

– 4 –


– 5 –

Naturally, French is the national language, and since it is very precise and detailed, it can be difficult to master. However, there are languages that are more verbose and more of a circumlocution. Trying to speak the language to native Parisians without sufficient practice may get you labeled a charlatan.

So if you are voluble, make sure you know how to speak the language. In terms of living, the cost of living is relatively high so if you are profligate you may want to be wary.

Three of the most famous Parisian landmarks are the Notre Dame Cathedral, the Eiffel Tower, and the Napoleonic Arc. These monuments attract visitors from near and far, from pragmatists to idealists. The Invalides Museum is the burial place for many great French soldiers and mercenaries, and of course Napoleon.

– 6 –

The Pantheon church is where many of France’s illustrious men and women are buried. The Palais Garnier, built in the later Second Empire period, houses the Paris Opera and the Paris Opera Ballet, while the former palace of the Louvre now houses one of the most famous museums in the world, the Louvre Museum. The Louvre is worldly renowned for the many famous works of art that it houses, including Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”.

– 7 –

The city of Paris and the Louvre are very often the subjects of an exorbitant amount of movies, books, art pieces, and many other works. These works range from fact filled documentaries to great works of fiction.

Paris and the Louvre recently played a central part in the The Da Vinci Code, a fictitious book (and now also a movie) based on rumors that Da Vinci himself was part of a clandestine and cryptic group that had inside knowledge on the bloodline of Jesus Christ. In the story, the surreptitious group and its activities are said to have taken place in Paris.

The book itself became popular due to its intriguing subject and because it was not too loquacious or prolix for the average reader. The book actually instigated a firestorm of controversy.

– 8 –

Many opponents of the book felt that the story was merely an attempt to undermine the Catholic and Christian religions and make a profit while doing so. Many people tried to obviate its release, but the law prevented them from stymieing its circulation. Nevertheless, there was a tremendous amount of garrulous protesting around the world. The furtiveness and duplicity of the subject matter intrigued millions of people around the world.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ___ Clandestine

2. ___ Cryptic

3. ___ Duplicity

4. ___ Furtive

5. ___ Incite

6. ___ Instigate

7. ___ Obviate

A. Prevent, avert, hinder

B. Exile, outsider, recluse

C. Impostor, fake, con

D. Weaken, undercut, damage

E. Sly, sneaky, stealthy

F. Vulgar, boorish, barbarous

G. Underhanded, furtive,

– 10 –

8. ___ Stymie

9. ___ Surreptitious

10. ___ Undermine

11. ___ Charlatan

12. ___ Hedonist

13. ___ Misanthrope

14. ___ Pariah

15. ___ Philistine

H. Cynic, skeptic, hater

I. Secret, underground, covert

J. Incite, bring about, set off

K. Enigmatic, obscure, mysterious

L. Provoke, instigate

M. Pleasure seeker, profligate

N. Bewilder, confuse, stump

O. Dishonesty, disloyalty

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ___ Pragmatist

17. ___ Profligate

18. ___ Scapegoat

19. ___ Virtuoso

20. ___ Xenophobe

21. ___ Circumlocution

22. ___ Diffuse

A. Prodigy, genius, maestro

B. Stray, deviate, wander

C. Talkative, chatty, voluble

D. Realist, practical person

E. Protracted, verbose, flowery

F. Fall guy, victim, whipping boy

G. One scared of the foreign

– 12 –

23. ___ Digress

24. ___ Garrulous

25. ___ Loquacious

26. ___ Mercenary

27. ___ Prolix

28. ___ Recluse

29. ___ Verbose

30. ___ Voluble

H. Rambling, meandering, evading

I. Hermit, loner, ascetic

J. Dissolute, immoral, extravagant

K. Vociferous, fluent, articulate

L. Disperse, disseminate, wordy

M. Containing many words

N. Long-winded, wordy, effusive

O. Legionnaire, professional soldier

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Paris is located in the ______ region of France.

A. Southern

B. Northern

C. Eastern

D. Western

2. Paris has an estimated population of around

A. 100,000

B. 2 million

C. 10 million

D. 500,000

– 14 –

3. Paris is home to opera’s _____ performers.

A. Recluse

B. Xenophobe

C. Virtuoso

D. Misanthrope

4. All of the following are Parisian landmarks except the _____.

A. Notre Dame Cathedral

B. Eiffel Tower

C. Saigon

D. Napoleonic Arc

– 15 –

5. The _____ museum houses the Mona Lisa.

A. Notre Dame

B. Pantheon

C. Invalides

D. Louvre

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ The capital city of France is Paris.

2. ____ Today, Paris is one of the world’s leading business and cultural centers.

3. ____ Paris is one of the least populated areas in Europe.

4. ____ Although Paris is a very beautiful city, there are not many things to do there.

5. ____ Paris is considered a romantic city.

6. ____ Paris is an attraction for over 30 million foreign visitors a year.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. What kind of things does Paris have influences on in the world?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Name and discuss some of the famous landmarks of Paris.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

3. Discuss some of the cultural attractions of Paris such as its museums.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. Would you like to visit Paris some day? Why or why not?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________







Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Superheroes HS SAT

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Superheroes

Since the unveiling of Superman in 1938, the very concept of superheroes has swept the world over, first through comic books, then cartoons, and eventually, live-action films. A superhero is a fictional character who is both a pacifist and a zealot in crime-fighting and righteousness.

Sometimes, superheroes have a young sidekick that oftentimes has his or her rebellious moments because he or she likes to play the hero too. Together, the heroes fight crime, insurgents, or whatever the evil villain may be.

– 2 –


– 3 –

The storylines that superheroes are in usually have the same thematic elements and conflicts, such as a ruthless villain that the protagonist has to deter. The villainous character can range anywhere from an arrogant or vainglorious person with superpowers himself, to a two-faced demagogue.

He is almost always an iconoclast as well, trying to destroy the very idea of the equality of man and trying to climb his way to the top. While villains often have heretic ways, the hero on the other hand stands firm in his belief of good and morality.

Contrasting with the decency of the hero, the villain usually has a pretentious façade and has an authoritarian aura about him, especially when dealing with his own partners-in-crime, showing that he looks out for only himself and uses others to help him gain his high status.

– 4 –


– 5 –

Sometimes, the villain may be the autocrat or despot of the entire city and have the city under his control.

It is up to the superhero to defeat the supercilious nemesis and bring peace to the city and its people by helping to bring justice to where it is needed.

The villain will usually be accompanied by some of the more amateur and haughty thugs who stoop to robbery and chicanery, only to be caught by the hero who will try to repress, and ultimately defeat them.

– 6 –

– 7 –

The superhero is a great partisan of fairness and peace, but works undercover and does not seek fame or rewards, which shows them to be humble and acting selflessly. Thus, many of them have a secret identity they exploit which also helps them to not attract attention or have the presumptuous villain target and obliterate his friends or family. In order to successfully hide their identity, some heroes wear masks to hide their face and don their identifiable and trademark costumes.

Another common element in superhero stories is betrayal. Occasionally, the superhero is a member or leader of a partnership or a whole team of heroes. One of the characters on the team may be persuaded and tricked by the disdainful villain, and used as bait against the others.

– 8 –

Under the control of the villain, the corrupted team member could perform acts of perfidy and could even be brought to subjugating the innocent city— or worse, his own teammates. The betraying team member can be characterized from an aloof and pompous show off, to the quiet and isolated vigilante trying to repress his inner demons.

A superhero is almost always subservient to society and believes in impartiality and integrity. Never condescending, the hero humbly takes up the responsibility to save the innocent from the corruption of the adversary, and the clutches of evil. Never trying to raze the fine line of fairness and honor, the hero stands strong and tall, on the side of justice, and for the good of humanity.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ___ Aloof

2. ___ Condescending

3. ___ Arrogant

4. ___ Disdainful

5. ___ Haughty

6. ___ Pompous

7. ___ Presumptuous

A. Snooty, High and mighty

B. Disdainful, scornful

C. Oppressor, autocrat

D. Dissenter, protestant, skeptic

E. Fanatic, believer, advocate

F. Strict, totalitarian, dictatorial

G. Patronizing, Pompous

– 10 –

9. ___ Supercilious

10. ___ Vainglorious

11. ___ Autocrat

12. ___ Authoritarian

13. ___ Despot

14. ___ Heretic

15. ___ Zealot

H. Audacious, bold, insolent

I. Scornful, mocking

J. Distant, Standoffish

K. Narcissistic, bigheaded

L. Conceited, proud

M. Snobbish, flaunting

N. Ostentatious, affected, showy

O. Tyrant, dictator

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ___ Iconoclast

17. ___ Demagogue

18. ___ Insurgent

19. ___ Pacifist

20. ___ Partisan

21. ___ Chicanery

22. ___ Coerce

A. Fraud, deception

B. Discourage, prevent

C. Abuse, manipulate

D. Cruel, callous, merciless

E. Follower, supporter

F. Treachery, betrayal, disloyalty

G. Subdue, conquer, overpower

– 12 –

23. ___ Deter

24. ___ Exploit

25. ___ Obliterate

26. ___ Perfidy

27. ___ Raze

28. ___ Repress

29. ___ Ruthless

30. ___ Subjugate

H. Nonconformist, rebel, radical

I. Tear down, level, ruin

J. Guerrilla, rebel, mutinous

K. Politician, revolutionary

L. Persuade, compel

M. Peace lover, antiwar

N. Wipe out, destroy

O. Dominate, hold back, inhibit

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. A superhero is usually

A. A demagogue

B. An iconoclast

C. A heretic

D. None of the above

2. A villain is usually

A. Heroic

B. Vainglorious

C. Honest

D. Fair

– 14 –

3. A superhero strives to achieve a high level of ______.

A. Chicanery

B. Supercilious

C. Despot

D. Selflessness

4. To “Obliterate”, means to

A. Save

B. Repeat

C. Destroy

D. None of the above

– 15 –

5. A superhero is a great of fairness and peace.

A. Despot

B. Presumptuous

C. Exploit

D. Partisan

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. The Unveiling of Superman in 1938 greatly contributed to the fame and popularity of superheroes.

2. Superheroes often have a partner or sidekick.

3. The protagonist is usually the villain.

4. The villains never have superpowers.

5. Although superheroes stand and believe in good, villains often display heretic ways.

6. A villain’s pretentious façade contrasts with the decency of the hero.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. Why do superheroes usually work undercover?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Describe some traits of a superhero.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

3. Describe some traits of a villain.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

4. Name your favorite superhero and discuss why you like him/her.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –








Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Sharks HS SAT

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Sharks

Sharks are one of the most feared creatures of the ocean. They are the dominant predator of the waters of the ocean. However, sharks are also the most misunderstood animal. Due to the large amount of often glamorized media reports of sharks attacking humans, whether in the news or in movies, there is a common misconception that sharks are “man-eating machines” that prey on humans. The disagreeable and common belief that sharks instinctively attack humans is false. Even some of the most cantankerous and petulant sharks will not bother us unless we provoke them first.

Unfortunately the nature of a shark is rather incorrigible, but the great majority of times they do not attack out of a spiteful will to harm humans. Sometimes sharks attack humans because they mistakenly view people on surfboards, or swimmers to be seals.

– 2 –


– 3 –

However, some kinds of sharks exhibit more violent behavior than others. That is not to say that they are necessarily out to attack humans, but they are more likely to attack in general. The top three sharks with the most recorded attacks are the Great White Shark, the Tiger shark, and the Bull shark.

It would be highly precocious to not ever vex these three kinds of sharks as they are extremely obdurate and grumpy. The Great White Shark can grow up to twenty-one feet long and weigh up to 7,000 lbs.

The Whale shark is probably the most (or one of the most) docile sharks of its species. These sharks are named Whale sharks because of their similar filter-eating habits of the whale, the largest living fish. The compliant Whale shark is known for its playfulness and gentleness. Unlike some of the “carnivorous” sharks in the sea, this shark feeds only on plankton, krill, and algae.

– 4 –

A precaution you should take while swimming in the ocean is to not wear any jewelry because a shark can mistake the flashy sheen for the scales of a fish or prey. Also, keep in mind that flailing and splashing in the water doesn’t scare sharks away. Instead, it actually attracts them even more because they will mistake you for a wounded aquatic animal— a perfect prey. It is extremely difficult to out-swim a shark, as some can swim as fast as forty-three miles an hour. Sometimes sharks give off subtle warning signs when approached by a suspected predator or danger, such as exaggerated or contorted swimming movement.

– 5 –

The remora fish, or suckerfish, have a tendency to “suction-cup” themselves onto sharks like parasites and live off of their hosts. They attach themselves to the shark for transportation, protection, and sometimes food. Another shark, the Pacific Angel shark, is flat like a stingray and remains concealed in the sand at the bottom of the ocean floor. This shark can remain hidden like this for weeks at a time and will not move until a decent prey swims over it. Then the Angel shark will attack its prey and eat it.

Wobbegong sharks are particularly intractable and recalcitrant because they are known for fastening their jaws on a prey and not letting go. They are extremely difficult to remove once they have bitten. Wobbegong sharks are extremely flexible, and even if a human grabs ahold of their fin tails, they can easily bend around and bite. Like many of the shark species, this stubborn fish won’t attack unless it gets peevish or querulous.

– 6 –

These days, the sharks that are being held captive in aquariums are being treated in a servile and fawning manner. The sycophants and toadies (usually the divers) have to keep the sharks’ living conditions and exocentric environments at a perfect ocean temperature and salinity in order for the shark to survive just as if it were living in the real ocean. Despite numerous attempts, not once has an aquarium been able to keep a Great White Shark behind walls as it would usually carp or smash itself against the glass. In one instance, an aquarium decided to house a 100 lb, 5 ½ feet long great white shark in their aquarium.

However, the shark had to be removed after several instances where it attempted to eat the other sharks in the aquarium, fatally wounding them. In some ways, sharks must be rather obsequious living in beautiful aquariums. They are held under the greatest care by professionals, instead of swimming near trashy beaches. Nevertheless, they are still confined behind glass walls and limited space.

– 7 –

The mating of sharks is not a gentle courtship. When courting, instead of ingratiating themselves or trying to impress the female, the male shark will engage in a captious swim with her and will often resort to violently biting or scratching the female until she accepts him. Female sharks either produce eggs or give birth to live pups, depending on the species. Sharks may have up to 40 pups at a time.

Sadly, for the last fifteen years, the number of sharks of nearly all the different species has declined by more than fifty percent. A number of various human activities are attributable to such a drastic decrease in the shark population. The most prevalent of these activities includes hunting sharks. Sometimes sharks are hunted for food.

– 8 –

Most of the time, however, they are hunted for sport, or for their skin, which can easily be sold for a profit. Sometimes, humans can be more curmudgeon than the sharks themselves. One thing that is a fact for sure is that humans are a much greater threat to the existence of sharks than vice versa. Within a couple of decades, sharks may be extinct.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ___ Compliant

2. ___ Docile

3. ___ Grumpy

4. ___ Incorrigible

5. ___ Intractable

6. ___ Obdurate

7. ___ Precocious

A. Incurable, hopeless

B. Stubborn, difficult

C. Submissive, yielding

D. Heartless, unsympathetic

E. Developing an ability sooner

F. Freeloader, leech

G. Similar to virtual reality

– 10 –

8. ___ Recalcitrant

9. ___ Stubborn

10. ___ Vex

11. ___ Exocentric

12. ___ Parasite

13. ___ Fawning

14. ___ Servile

15. ___ Flashy

H. Unruly, noncompliant

I. Persistent, unyielding

J. Submissive, weak

K. Passive, quiet

L. Showy, gaudy

M. Cranky, grouchy

N. Annoy, irk

O. Obedient, conforming

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ___ Sycophant

17. ___ Ingratiate

18. ___ Toady

19. ___ Obsequious

20. ___ Trashy

21. ___ Cantankerous

22. ___ Captious

A. Flattering, submissive

B. Fault-finding, difficult to please

C. Bad-tempered person

D. Hard, tricky, not easy

E. Cheap, tacky, worthless

F. Complain, grumble, nag

G. Hidden, obscured, covered

– 12 –

23. ___ Difficult

24. ___ Disagreeable

25. ___ Carp

26. ___ Peevish

27. ___ Concealed

28. ___ Petulant

29. ___ Curmudgeon

30. ___ Querulous

H. Make oneself favorable

I. Bad-tempered, irritable

J. Crabby, cranky, grumpy

K. Argumentative, confrontational

L. Flattering, brown-nosing

M. Grouchy, irritable

N. Flatterer, seeker of self-interest

O. Unpleasant, offensive

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Which shark is not one of the top three attackers of humans?

A. Tiger Shark

B. Hammerhead Shark

C. Great White Shark

D. Bull Shark

2. The Great White Shark can grow as long as

A. 21 feet

B. 11 feet

C. 41 feet

D. 32 feet

– 14 –

3. The most peaceful shark is the

A. Bull Shark

B. Leopard Shark

C. Whale Shark

D. None of the above

4. Some sharks can swim as fast as

A. 43 miles an hour

B. 72 miles an hour

C. 64 miles an hour

D. 25 miles an hour

– 15 –

5. Over the last 15 years the number of sharks has

A. Increased

B. Decreased

C. Remained the Same

D. Fluctuated inconsistently

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ___ Great White Sharks can weight as much as 10,000 lbs

2. ___ To deter sharks, you should wear jewelry in the water.

3. ___ The Pacific Angel Shark is similar to the stingray.

4. ___ Sharks are truly “man-eating machines.”

5. ___ Flailing and splashing in water deters sharks.

6. ___ Wobbegong sharks are know to lock their jaw when biting.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. What is the future of sharks as a species?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Why have the number of sharks begun to decrease?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

3. Describe the remora fish.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

4. How do you feel about sharks? Explain.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –








Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Earthquakes HS SAT

Page 2 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Questions Page 12 Questions Page 14 Questions Page 16 Questions Page 18 Questions Page 20 Questions




This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Earthquake

An earthquake is one of the most pernicious, tenacious, and notorious natural disasters that affects our world today. Earthquakes are caused when stored energy is released from Earth’s crust, creating waves that shake the surface.

If the earthquake takes place where there is water instead of land, a tsunami can form which can lead to catastrophic damages. Although we associate earthquakes with being on a large scale and extremely destructive, there are small earthquakes also. These small earthquakes actually occur constantly around the world. Places such as California and Alaska, are common sites for earthquakes.

Outside the U.S., common places include Chile, Indonesia, Greece, Japan, and New Zealand. Many people are audacious and intrepid enough to live in these areas.

– 2 –


– 3 –

Even after an earthquake strikes, the people living there remain resolute. In ancient times however, earthquakes were viewed as an insidious way for the vindictive gods to punish nefarious and depraved human beings. Today, that malicious punishment theory for the turpitude of the world is no longer as prevalent.

Earthquakes can occur at any moment. They can occur even at the most boring of times when you least expect it. You may be lying in your backyard indolently, but in the next instant an earthquake may strike. It can catch you by surprise, especially if you’re in a lackadaisical mood.

– 4 –

The common pattern in earthquakes has been that the larger the earthquake, the less frequently it occurs; the smaller the earthquake, the more frequently it occurs. Earthquakes are measured on what is called the “Richter Scale,” a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being the strongest earthquake and 1 being the weakest. Since the year 1900, there have been an average of 18 major earthquakes (7 to 7.9 on the Richter Scale) and one great earthquake (8.0 and above) per year.

– 5 –

Since earthquakes are not preventable, the only thing that assiduous scientists can do is research and develop technology to predict earthquakes. This is a tremendous amount of work and often enervates those involved. Even though the subject matter can be soporific to some, their diligent work helps tremendously and should be appreciated.

The most physically visible effects of earthquakes are shaking and ground rupturing. These effects tend to cause major damage to buildings and other firm structures. Earthquakes can also cause landslides and avalanches in hilly or mountainous regions that destroys whatever lies at the base of the mountain. Fires are also common as a result of things such as the breaking of electrical power or gas lines due to the ground rupturing.

– 6 –

Other effects include deleterious gasses, diseases, lack of basic needs, loss of life, and higher insurance premiums. Scientists are indefatigable in their efforts to learn more about earthquakes so we can better protect ourselves.

– 7 –

The most devastating earthquake in U.S. history was the infamous San Francisco earthquake in 1906, which was over an 8.0 on the Richter scale. The earthquake killed 3,000 people. One of the largest earthquakes in world history was the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake and Tsunami in 2004. With a 9.3 Richter scale rating, it is the second largest earthquake in recorded history. It occurred in South east Asia, took the lives of over 285,000 people, and debilitated thousands more. Those are only two examples out of hundreds of earthquakes that have left cities and towns languishing.

Since earthquakes are not uncommon, you should always be prepared for one if you live in an earthquake-prone region. Even though earthquakes can’t be prevented, there are measures you can take to ensure your safety. There are many options besides being stagnant.

– 8 –

Safety is something you should be proactive and adamant about, especially if you live in an area at risk to such an indomitable force. If you decide to be lethargic and listless instead, you will hurt your ability to take safety precautions.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Deleterious

2. ____ Depraved

3. ____ Infamous

4. ____ Insidious

5. ____ Malicious

6. ____ Nefarious

7. ____ Notorious

A. Sinister, dangerous, menacing

B. Hateful, mean, evil

C. Sluggish, tired, lazy

D. Notorious, well-known, recognized

E. Wicked, evil, despicable

F. Famous for something negative

G. Destructive, harmful

– 10 –

8. ____ Pernicious

9. ____ Turpitude

10. ____ Vindictive

11. ____ Boring

12. ____ Debilitate

13. ____ Languish

14. ____ Lethargic

15. ____ Enervate

H. Harmful, poisonous, deadly

I. Suffer, rot, decay

J. Wickedness, immorality

K. Weaken, hamper, hinder

L. Unforgiving, revengeful

M. Weaken, debilitate

N. Dull, not exciting

O. Immoral, corrupt, wicked

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ____ Listless

17. ____ Indolent

18. ____ Stagnant

19. ____ Lackadaisical

20. ____ Soporific

21. ____ Adamant

22. ____ Assiduous

A. Still, motionless

B. Hardworking, thorough, attentive

C. Persistent, stubborn, dogged

D. Lacking energy, listless

E. Positive, plan ahead

F. Apathetic, careless

G. Dull, monotonous, sleep-inducing

– 12 –

23. ____ Audacious

24. ____ Diligent

25. ____ Indefatigable

26. ____ Indomitable

27. ____ Intrepid

28. ____ Proactive

29. ____ Resolute

30. ____ Tenacious

H. Resolute, stubborn, unyielding

I. Firm, determined, steadfast

J. Fearless, brave, valiant

K. Diligent, hardworking, tireless

L. Daring, bold, brave

M. Untiring, unrelenting

N. Strong, unconquerable, stubborn

O. Lazy, laid-back

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Where do earthquakes form?

A. Earth’s surface

B. Earth’s core

C. Earth’s crust

D. None of the above

2. An earthquake released under water can cause a:

A. Tsunami

B. Tidal Wave

C. Hurricane

D. Tropical Storm

– 14 –

3. The rating system used to measure earthquakes is called the:

A. Disaster Scale

B. Quake Scale

C. Richard Scale

D. Richter Scale

4. The average number of great earthquakes a year is:

A. 1

B. 5

C. 10

D. 15

– 15 –

5. A common place for earthquake occurrences in the U.S. is:

A. Alaska

B. California

C. Texas

D. A and B

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ A major earthquake measures above 8.0 on the Richter scale.

2. ____ A great earthquake measures between 7 and 7.9 on the Richter scale.

3. ____ Earthquakes can cause landslides and avalanches.

4. ____ There are an average of 15 major earthquakes a year.

5. ____ The most devastating earthquake in U.S. history took place in Los Angeles.

6. ____ Earthquakes can often be prevented.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. Discuss the effects of earthquakes.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What was the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake andTsunami?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

3. Name places outside the U.S. commonly struck by earthquakes.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. How does an earthquake form?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________







Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Saturn HS SAT

Page 2 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Questions Page 12 Questions Page 14 Questions Page 16 Questions Page 18 Questions Page 20 Questions




This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Saturn

For years Saturn was considered one of the eight planets in our solar system. The sixth planet from the sun, and the second largest planet, behind Jupiter. The name “Saturn” came from the Roman god “Saturnus” who is the father of Zeus in Roman mythology. Most of Saturn is composed of hydrogen, with a small amount of helium and other elements.

The interior of Saturn is made of a rocky core with several layers around it. The interior is extremely hot, reaching temperatures of 21,000 °F. Getting anywhere near enough to such a temperature will leave you with pain that can’t be alleviated or assuaged. Saturn’s surface is very windy, with speeds reaching up to several hundred miles an hour.

– 2 –


– 3 –

The famous rings around Saturn are made up mostly of ice with small amounts of rocky debris and dust, a sign that the rings are not solid and stationary. There are approximately 62 moons around Saturn. The largest of Saturn’s moons is called Titan. Titan is actually larger than the planet Mercury and is the only moon in our solar system to have a significant atmosphere.

The rings of Saturn were first discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei with the use of a telescope. At the time, Galileo did not realize that they were rings. However, his discovery served as a certain harbinger of discoveries yet to come. Even though he did not recognize that what he saw were rings, he still must have felt a certain elation to have discovered something. Eventually, in 1655, Christian Huygens did recognize that they were rings. Huygen’s discovery was facilitated by an upgraded and much more powerful telescope.

– 4 –

With the help of the new telescope, Huygens was able to see them more clearly. Giovanni Cassini improved the findings further in 1675 when he noticed that the ring was composed of several smaller rings. It wasn’t until 1859 when James Maxwell ultimately determined that these rings were made up of many small particles. Such a discovery was inevitable considering bigger and more powerful telescopes.

Even though all of these men are distinguished for their contribution to the knowledge we have gained about Saturn, their motivation was altruistic, not for individual fame. They did not have 59 a significant number of charitable benefactors at the time, yet they still were able to succeed in their discoveries without benevolent support.

What they have done is almost heroic, truly a magnanimous service to our knowledge of the universe. Today we finally realize the importance of learning about our solar system, and thanks to the largess of munificent and philanthropic organizations, we can continue on in the tradition of exploration.

– 5 –

The first close exploration of Saturn was made in a flyby mission in 1979 by the unmanned spacecraft named Pioneer 11. The decision to target Pioneer 11 to pass through ring of Saturn in order to test the route that the space probe Voyager would be coming through later was full of temerity. NASA officials decided to go on this very chary expedition through unknown territory. Pioneer 11 was quite literally acting as a true “Pioneer.”

While passing through Saturn’s ring plane, Pioneer 11 had a very near collision with what was later discovered to be one of Saturn’s small moons, believed to be the moon “Epimetheus.” Pioneer 11 missed the moon by only a few thousand kilometers. Pioneer 11 sent back a great deal of priceless new information about Saturn and many spectacular pictures of Saturn’s rings.

– 6 –


– 7 –

Nasa officials probably felt a great deal of exultation after Pioneer 11 made it out successfully and with great new discoveries. It flew within a few thousand miles of Saturn’s clouds and took pictures of its moons. Unfortunately, Pioneer 11 was not able to obtain clear images of the actual surface of the planet.

Then, in 1980, showing no trepidation, another ameliorated spacecraft (Voyager 1) appeased the curious public by visiting Saturn’s system and capturing the first high-resolution images of Saturn and its rings. Although these advancements have given us more knowledge, the public’s curiosity and eagerness for more knowledge will probably need to be mollified and placated by further expeditions to Saturn.

– 8 –

Many cultures are very familiar with Saturn and its rings, and they sometimes attribute different meanings to it. The Chinese and Japanese cultures call it “the earth star,” while Hindu astrology recognizes Saturn as the judge among all planets. In terms of positioning, it is the farthest visible to the naked eye.

Next time there is an auspicious night sky, look up and maybe you will see Saturn, which appears as a magnificent, bright, yellowish, star. You don’t need to feel apprehensive though; it is not as bright as the sun, so you don’t need sunglasses to mitigatethe brightness. Oftentimes it is difficult to tell whether that bright point of light is a star or a planet, and you may vacillate between one and the other.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Apprehensive

2. ____ Harbinger

3. ____ Auspicious

4. ____ Inevitable

5. ____ Chary

6. ____ Temerity

7. ____ Elation

A. Sign, omen, indicator

B. Unpreventable, bound to happen

C. Kind, caring, compassionate

D. Go back and forth, waver

E. Delight, jubilation, excitement

F. Generous donation, gifts

G. Wonderful, brilliant, outstanding

– 10 –

8. ____ Exultation

9. ____ Vacillate

10. ____ Altruistic

11. ____ Largess

12. ____ Benefactor

13. ____ Magnificent

14. ____ Benevolent

H. Fear, nervousness, concern

I. Unselfish, kind, charitable

J. Nervous, scared, anxious

K. Wary, cautious, suspicious

L. Lucky, favorable, promising

M. Donator, helper

N. Joy, excitement

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ____ Magnanimous

17. ____ Charitable

18. ____ Munificent

19. ____ Heroic

20. ____ Philanthropic

21. ____ Alleviate

22. ____ Improve

A. Giving, generous

B. Improve, advance

C. Appease, lessen anger

D. Brave, courageous, valiant

E. To make easier, assist

F. Charitable, generous, giving

G. Make better, advance

– 12 –

23. ____ Mitigate

24. ____ Appease

25. ____ Mollify

26. ____ Assuage

27. ____ Placate

28. ____ Facilitate

29. ____ Upgrade

H. Improve, make better

I. Forgiving, noble, generous

J. Generous, kind, unselfish

K. Make less severe

L. Soothe, relieve, satisfy

M. Calm, lessen in intensity

N. Lessen, ease

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Friends demonstrate all of the following qualities except:

A. Honesty

B. Loyalty

C. Sympathy

D. Greed

2. The rarest type of friendship is a(n):

A. Casual friendship

B. Acquaintance

C. Lifelong friendship

D. Unfriendly friendship

– 14 –

3. Friendship is a process that begins:

A. In school and within the family

B. When we’re adults

C. Unnaturally

D. None of the above

4. Opportunities to make friends occur:

A. Whenever we meet people

B. A few times a year

C. Very rarely

D. Once a week

– 15 –

5. Which group of people is naturally our first group of friends?

A. Family

B. Teachers

C. Neighbors

D. Students

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ Friends are there to care for each other in times of need.

2. ____ Making friends is always an easy process.

3. ____ A good friend usually makes a bad day worse.

4. ____ Children make most of their friends at school.

5. ____ Friends will always have disputes and arguments along the way.

6. ____ Lifelong friends are very common.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. What qualities make a good friend?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What are the different types of friendships?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

3. How can friends make your life better?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

4. Give examples of arguments that friends often have.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –








Categories
English books High School HS Advanced High

Mustang

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Mustang

Amongst the myriad of cars and trucks produced by the Ford Motor Company, perhaps the most famous model of them all is the Ford Mustang, an affordable sports car option for parsimonious individuals.

The famous Mustang is also known as a “Pony Car”, a sort of “muscle car”. You do not have to be affluent to own one, since it’s not exactly a majestic car, but at the same time you cannot be penniless. The Ford Mustang is offered at a great value, but an impecunious homeless person would probably still not be able to afford one.

– 2 –


– 3 –

On many occasions, the Mustang has been named by respected car magazines as one of the top ten best cars available on the market. It has even won a number of car-of-the-year awards. First released in 1964, the Mustang sold nearly 1.5 million units in its first eighteen months and has since been consistently enhanced to remain successful. Furthermore, there are copious numbers of Mustangs available, unlike many other sports cars whose production numbers are limited.

Although Ford makes sure that its Mustang is available enough to not become depleted, it is careful not to produce a surfeit, or popularity might decrease due to overexposure. Fortunately, even though they are always able to garner enough popularity for the Mustang, Ford has never exhibited any signs of avarice.

– 4 –

One reason the Mustang has been consistently popular throughout the course of its life is that Ford has significantly augmented the model of the Mustang many times throughout the life of the model, making more than paltry advancements each time.

– 5 –

The first model was a two-seat, mid-engine car. It was produced from 1964 to1973. Many minor changes were made during that period, but the major design change that marked the second generation of the Mustang did not arrive until 1974.

In 1973, Ford believed that the Mustang had digressed too far from its fundamental design, so an entirely new design replete with changes was prepared for 1974. The result was the second generation Mustang. The Mustang II was based on another car, the Ford Pinto. The new Mustang sold more than 400,000 units the first year. It featured advanced innovations such as rack-and-pinion steering and a mechanism that drastically decreased noise and vibration.

– 6 –

In 1979, the third generation Mustang became available. This new model differed from the smaller, compact, scanty model of Mustangs that were previously popular. The interior was completely recreated and could seat four people. It also featured a larger trunk. Overall, the platform was roomier than before. This new, third generation platform was known as the “Fox”.

– 7 –

The fourth generation Mustang began in 1994 and marked the first time in 15 years that the platform of the Mustang was redesigned. In 1994, for the third time in the mustang’s history, the mustang was named car of the year by the renowned Motor Trend magazine. In 2003, once again, Ford changed the Fox-based platform of the Mustang Cobra. This cobra not only featured the 4.6L V8 32 valve engine as the previous cobra but it had a radical addition of an Eaton Supercharger, supported by its new 390 horsepower inter-cooled cast iron engine block.

The new platform also featured a change from the 5-speed Tremec transmission to the T-56 6-speed. Ford internally gave this new SVT Mustang Cobra platform the codename, “The Terminator”.

– 8 –

It was so named because it was meant to terminate the competition, and finally lay to rest disputes on whether the Mustang or Chevrolet Camaro, the Mustang’s historic rival, was better. Ironically, the Camaro was also discontinued the same year due to low sales. The fourth generation Mustang ran through 2004.

– 9 –

The fifth, and present day generation of the mustang came in 2005. The new look of the mustang was modeled after the first generation mustangs. This new platform inspired by the Mustangs of the 1960’s, featured a “retro-futurism” design by combining the classic essence and look of the original mustangs with modern technology and a hint of modern looks.

Included in these modern technological upgrades is the new 4.6L 3-valve Modular V8 engine with variable camshaft timing. In line with inspiration of these new Mustangs, new high performance models have been created in tribute to the great classic models such as the Boss 302 Mustang, the Mach 1, the Mustang SVO, the SVT Cobra, and of course the Shelby GT500.

– 10 –

With the different generations of models, Ford has also produced variants of each type of Mustang featuring different engines and commodities (such as the V6, GT, Cobra, and others). However, the high performance models are fabricated in paucity. Many people make personal changes to their own cars, creating sort of a “unique generation.” The high customizability of the Mustang has been a great contributing factor to the popularity of the Mustang throughout the generations.

– 11 –

Mustang enthusiasts love to modify their cars. Some of these changes can be opulent, to the point where they are ostentatious. Oftentimes, many of these changes are made to increase the car’s horsepower and speed. However, this can be dangerous, and prodigal individuals should be careful not to squander their sumptuous cars by wrecking them.

The Mustang model remains profuse to this day. The death of the Mustang is nowhere to be foreseen. Considering it’s a sports car, the price tag has also remained affordable even for frugal individuals. Although the Mustang probably still remains expensive for those that are destitute, Ford’s aim to maintain the mustang as an economical vehicle has been anything but miserly.

– 12 –

The arrival of the next Mustang generation is unknown, but given the history of the Mustang and Ford’s ability to produce popular cars, it is highly unlikely that there will be a dearth of buyers for the next Mustang.

– 13 –

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Augment

2. ____ Avaricious

3. ____ Deplete

4. ____ Enhance

5. ____ Frugal

6. ____ Garner

7. ____ Miserly

8. ____ Parsimonious

9. ____ Prodigal

A. Improve, make, better

B. Cheap, penny-pinching

C. Gather, collect

D. Supplement, add to, expand

E. To waste, spend, misuse

F. Demise, end, fall

G. Shortage, lack, drought

H. Poor, penniless

I. Impoverished, needy, indigent

– 14 –

10. ____ Squander

11. ____ Death

12. ____ Dearth

13. ____ Destitute

14. ____ Homeless

15. ____ Impecunious

J. Destitute, living on the streets

K. Greedy, covetous

L. Eat up, diminish

M. Miserable, stingy, measly

N. Wasteful, profligate, dissolute

O. Thrifty, economical, stingy

– 15 –

Match each word in the left column with a word in right column that best matches its definition.

16. ____ Paltry

17. ____ Paucity

18. ____ Penniless

19. ____ Penury

20. ____ Scanty

21. ____ Affluent

22. ____ Copious

23. ____ Majestic

A. Rich, prosperous, well off

B. Poverty, pennilessness

C. Countless, multitude

D. Pretentious, brazen, showy

E. Surplus, excess

F. Scarcity, lack, rarity

G. Plentiful, abundant, prolific

H. Luxurious, plush, superb

– 16 –

24. ____ Myriad

25. ____ Opulent

26. ____ Ostentatious

27. ____ Profuse

28. ____ Replete

29. ____ Sumptuous

30. ____ Surfeit

I. Complete, sated, full

J. Impoverished, broke, bankrupt

k. Abundant, plentiful, numerous

L. Wealthy, lavish, magnificent

M. Scarce, very little, insufficient

N. Worthless, wretched, base

O. Royal, regal, grand

– 17 –

Multiple Choice

1. The mustang was created by _____.

A. Chevrolet

B. The Ford Motor Company

C. Fordever Motors

D. Dodge

2. The Mustang is also known as a “_____”

A. Sedan

B. Pony Car

C. Horse wagon

D. Horse Buggy

– 18 –

3. The Mustang was first released in _____

A. 1890

B. 1910

C. 1964

D. 1987

4. The third generation (1979-1993) Mustang is known as the

A. “Eleanor”

B. “Bullitt”

C. “Knight Rider”

D. “Fox”

– 19 –

5. The 2003 SVT Mustang Cobra was codenamed the

A. “General Lee”

B. “Kit”

C. “Terminator”

D. “Superman”

– 20 –

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ The Mustang sold nearly 1.5 million units in its first eighteen months it was released.

2. ____ The first Mustang was a two-seat mid-engine car.

3. ____ The Cobra made by Ford is not a mustang.

4. ____ A “Retro-futurism” design means it is completely futuristic and contains nothing from the past.

5. ____ The Mustang II was based on the Ford Pinto.

6. ____ The 2005 Mustang was designed to look similar to the mustangs from the 1960’s.

7. ____ The Mustang only comes in one standard engine for all of its models.

– 21 –

Short answer.

1. Name and briefly discuss some of the high performance mustangs.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Why have Mustangs been so popular over the years?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

3. What does the “unique generation” of mustangs refer to? Explain.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 22 –

4. What is your favorite Mustang? Why?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 23 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 24 –








Mustang
Categories
Continuing Education English books English CE High School HS Advanced High SAT Preparation

Unit 13 – Medicine CE SAT

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This book developed by ©Academy Global Learning 2020
All rights reserved under ©Academy Global Learning 2020. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.

Designed By:
Christian Alas
Created and illustrated By:
Angelo Romero and Camilo Sanabria

Medicine

Medicine refers to the practice concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through study, diagnosis, and treatment. Physicians, also known as doctors, are the individuals that are qualified and receive approbation to study and practice medicine. Since the 19th century, only those with a medical degree have been considered worthy to practice medicine. Physicians are some of the most venerated members of society.

– 2 –


– 3 –

The medical profession is composed of the group of people formally trained and authorized to apply medical knowledge. Many countries and legal jurisdictions have regulations on who is permitted to practice medicine. Within the medicine field, there are various specialties, such as family practice, cardiology, neurology, sports medicine, research, or public health.

Human societies have had various systems of health care practice since the beginning of recorded history. The earliest type of medicine in most cultures was the use of plants, herbs, and animal parts. This medicine was usually used in conjunction with specious rituals of various kinds. Some of these apocryphal beliefs include animism (the belief that inanimate objects have spirits), spiritualism (appealing to gods or communion with ancestor spirits), and shamanism (vesting an individual with mystic powers).

– 4 –


– 5 –

Medicine, as it is practiced today, developed largely in the late eighteenth century, and early nineteenth century in England, Germany, and France. Even today, there are still many different viewpoints concerning the proper application of medicine.

Sometimes, when it is disputable which opinion is right or better than another, experts may belittle and deride each other which can leave many people feeling acrimonious. However, most doctors today are viewed with deference because of their prestigious position in society. Many people would trade places to be in a doctor’s shoes.

Many physicians are so easygoing and casual that their attitude belies the dedication and effort put forth to take care of patients. Some doctors are so good that they receive adulation and acclaim in the form of accolades for their work

– 6 –

Some doctors are experts in their field and are extolled for it. However if an unfortunate calumny were to spread, all of this can be taken away in a second. The field of medicine is constantly changing and new theories and ideas are constantly being tested. Many new findings are deprecated or denounced if they seem too absurd and do not have adequate support.

– 7 –

So, although rare, some reports may even be embellished or fabricated in order to gain approval from the medical field. These spurious documents are usually quickly exposed. Gossip in the field of medicine can spread like wildfire if a promising new advancement is discovered.

A vital aspect of medicine is the relationship between the patient and doctor. Although many people visit the doctor’s office for similar problems such as a cold, flu, shots and others, their experiences can be vastly different, depending on the attitude of the doctor. Sometimes the doctor’s attitude can make the difference in the visit being fun or painful.

Doctors should always be tolerant and helpful towards their patients, never using caustic remarks to disparage the ones they should be helping.

– 8 –

The patients don’t necessarily have to exalt their doctor and sometimes if a doctor makes a serious mistake, the patient may go off on a diatribe and impugn the doctor.

The physicians that are caring and understanding are usually the ones that are commended and eulogized. Unfortunately, sometimes doctors have to break bad news to patients. It is a difficult task, but the worst thing a doctor could do is equivocate. Any kind of attempt to prevaricate will inevitably have drastic consequences. Honesty is vital to the doctor-patient relationship.

– 9 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

1. ____ Acrimonious

2. ____ Belittle

3. ____ Caustic

4. ____ Denounce

5. ____ Deprecate

6. ____ Deride

7. ____ Diatribe

A. Denounce, criticize, condemn

B. An attack, harangue, rant

C. Hold responsible, charge

D. Tribute, honor, award

E. Scathing, sarcastic, corrosive

F. Deal, skill, exchange

G. Praise, entrust, hand over

– 10 –

8. ____ Disparage

9. ____ Impugn

10. ____ Trade

11. ____ Acclaim

12. ____ Accolade

13. ____ Adulation

14. ____ Approbation

15. ____ Commend

I. Adoration, admiration, reverence

J. Ridicule, mock, disdain

K. Demean, put down

L. Approval, consent

M. Condemn, accuse

N. Belittle, denigrate

O. Approval, praise

– 11 –

Vocabulary

Match each word in the left column with a description in the right column that best matches its meaning

16. ____ Deference

17. ____ Eulogize

18. ____ Exalt

19. ____ Extol

20. ____ Venerate

21. ____ Apocryphal

22. ____ Belie

23. ____ Calumny

A. False, sham, erroneous

B. Contradict, disprove

C. Mythical, legendary

D. Hedge, stall, evade

E. Prevaricate, beat around the bush

F. Make up, manufacture

G. Admire, worship

H. Rumor, scandal, hearsay

– 12 –

24. ____ Embellish

25. ____ Equivocate

26. ____ Fabricate

27. ____ Gossip

28. ____ Prevaricate

29. ____ Specious

30. ____ Spurious

I. Respect, reverence

J. Extol, sing the praises of

K. Bogus, counterfeit, illegitimate

L. Decorate, adorn, exaggerate

M. Slander, defamation

N. Praise, applaud

O. Revere, idolize

– 13 –

Multiple Choice

1. Medicine refers to the practice concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through:

A. Study, prediction, hypothesis
B. Study and experiments
C. Study, diagnosis, and treatment
D. Observation, hypothesis, and approbation

2. Another word for “Doctor” is

A. Physicist
B. Physician
C. Pharmacist
D. Scientist

– 14 –

3. The following are sub-branches of the medicine field except:

A. Cardiology
B. Itchyology
C. Neurology
D. Sports medicine

4. Doctors receive ________ to study and practice medicine.

A. Specious
B. Apocryphal
C. Animism
D. Approbation

– 15 –

5. The earliest type of medicine in most cultures was the use of

A. Dirt and water
B. Rubbing alcohol
C. Plants, herbs and animal parts
D. None of the above

– 16 –

True or False

Choose whether each statement is true or false and write your answer in the space provided.

1. ____ Within the medicine field, there are various specialties
2. ____ Human societies have had various different systems of health care practice since at least the beginnixng of recorded history.
3. ____ Shamanism is a neurological disorder.
4. ____ Honesty is vital to the doctor-patient relationship, even when bad news is being delivered.
5. ____ The field of medicine remains constant and has few changes in practice or new theories.
6. ____ Equivocation is an essential skill in a doctor-patient relationship.

– 17 –

Short Answer

1. Discuss some of the early types of medicine and beliefs that were practiced

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. Explain the Doctor-patient relationship and why it is vital.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

3. Who can practice medicine and what is necessary to do so?.

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 18 –

4. Why is the practice of medicine so essential to our society?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

Reading Questions

1. What is the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

2. What example supports the writer’s main idea?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 19 –

3. How does the example help the writer’s argument?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

4. What do you think about the story?

______________________________________
______________________________________
______________________________________

– 20 –